Côt

Maisons Brûlées

Maison Brûlées 'Burnt Houses' is named so because of a fire that destroyed several houses in the village. It's infamous vineyard and winery has recently passed hands from longtime vigneron Michel Augé to Paul and Corine Gillet who have been making wine there since 2013. Michel was head of one of the first biodynamic coops in France and still hold meetings in Maison Brûlées where members gather to make their biodynamic preparations together (the estate officially certified Biodynamic in 1994).

Simon Busser

A protegée of the great Olivier Cousin and avid devotée to horse ploughing, Simon Busser farms 5 ha of Malbec, Merlot and Tannat on the Lot River, outside Cahors. The influence of his mentor is clear in Simon's biodynamic rituals. In lieu of copper, he applies fermented teas and local plant extracts such as garlic, willow and nettle on the vines. The vineyard is relatively flat and benefits from free draining soil, long warm days and cool nights which give the wines the complexity they deserve under the guidance of such a talented vigneron.

Clos du Tue-Boeuf

Thierry and Jean-Marie Puzelat enjoy making wine, which is a good thing as they produce a lot of them, sometimes close to 30 different wines a year. They feel so many of their parcels offer something unique worth exploring in its own right. Many of their cuvées are made often out of rare local varieties on the verge of extinction such as Romarantin, Grosleau and Menu Pineau- a natural mutation of Chenin Blanc). These wines made from these grapes rarely gain AOC recognition and so are labelled Vin De France, one of the biggest disappointments of modern winemaking laws.