Grolleau

Domaine de Mirebeau

In 1998 Bruno Rochard took over the reigns from his parents at Domaine de Mirebeau situated in Anjou close to the city of Rablay sur Layon. Before Bruno took over, the domaine was farming grapes and making wine conventionally so Bruno undertook the task of converting the 6 ha to organic production. The vines consist of 50% Chenin Blanc, 27% Cabernet Franc and 33% Grolleau, the latter of which Rochard champions as a perfect grape for red wine production, particularly with soils of clay and pebbles which keep the vines neither too hot nor too cold.

Toby Bainbridge

Toby Bainbridge has had a pretty adventurous life for a Brit. He used to work the corn harvests on his combine harvester travelling through the USA before finding a wife and relocating to the Loire to be a winemaker. After studying at the agricultural school in Anjou, he met and became friends with Didier Chaffardon who he worked with until moving on to Domaine Rene Mosse for several years. During his time with Mosse, he started to buy up small parcels of vines, starting with the Rouge Aux Lèvres, one here and one there.

Olivier Cousin

In 1987, Olivier Cousin took over his grandfather’s 12ha located around the village of Martigne Briand, South of Angers. Thanks to his grandfather, the vines have never been sprayed with chemicals due to his opinion that anyone that does so is ‘dumb in the ass’. We agree. In 1996 Olivier took the steps to officiating the wines as biodynamic although this has always been his way. Today he still makes wines from his plots of Cabernet Franc, but has passed his parcels of Chardonnay, Chenin Blanc, Gamay and Grolleau onto his son, Baptiste.

Mark Angéli

The man, the myth the legend Mark Angéli used to be a stone mason before herniating a disc on his back which stopped him from continuing his work. One of his final clients paid him in Sauternes which changed the course of his life, inspiring him to seek an education in winemaking and search for vineyards to call his own, finally coming across a plot in Anjou in 1990. Now perhaps the most notorious trailblazers of modern Anjou, Monsieur Angéli has helped many winemakers enter the region, even finding parcels and investment for start-up vignerons.

Bruno Rochard

In 1998 Bruno Rochard took over the reigns from his parents at Domaine de Mirebeau situated in Anjou close to the city of Rablay sur Layon. Before Bruno took over, the domaine was farming grapes and making wine conventionally so Bruno undertook the task of converting the 6 ha to organic production. The vines consist of 50% Chenin Blanc, 27% Cabernet Franc and 33% Grolleau, the latter of which Rochard champions as a perfect grape for red wine production, particularly with soils of clay and pebbles which keep the vines neither too hot nor too cold.

Château de Passavant

Located in the Southern tip of Anjou in Haut-Layon, Château de Passavant makes 14 different wines from 55ha across 7 appellations. Certified organic since 1998 and biodynamic since 2011, current winemakers Claire and Olivier Lecomte are fourth generation vignerons at the Château, striving to maximise the potential of the incredible range of soils which include schist, sand and gravel varieties along with different aspects and slopes, all playing their part in the formation of the wines.

Cyril le Moing

Cyril Moing is a relative newcomer to Anjou, and part of the new wave Angevin who arrived in the region and were offered support and knowledge from fellow vignerons Mark Angeli and Olivier Cousin. Cyril owns 3 plots across 3Ha in Thouracé, Aubigné and Malignant. Varieties are Grolleau, Gamay and Chenin Blanc which express pure fruit with a firm backbone of acidity. Cyril abandoned SO2 use in 2008 and has never looked back.

Le Batossay

Son of natural wine linchpin, Olivier, Baptiste Cousin has taken over the reigns of some of his fathers vineyards, predominantly the Gamay, Grolleau, with a small percentage of Chenin Blanc and Cabernet Franc. Baptiste is very much his father’s son, carrying on with the same natural traditions such as horse ploughing, biodynamic preparations and no additions of SO2.